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Upcoming Funding Deadlines

September

NSF: TCUP

Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP)

    Partnerships in Geoscience Education: 4/14/17

    Instructional Capacity Excellence in TCUP Institutions: 9/02/17

    Targeted STEM Infusion Projects: 9/16/17

    SEA-PHAGES in TCUs: 10/03/17

    Small Grants for Research: 12/04/17

Project Description: A new funding track, Partnerships for Documentary Linguistics Education (PADLE), is offered collaboratively by this program and the Documenting Endangered Languages program (DEL) in the Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE). The strand provides support for collaborations that will improve TCUP institutions' instructional capacity in documentary linguistics (descriptive linguistics, computational methodology, archiving and preservation); attract, retain and support TCUP students in internships and research endeavors deemed to be necessary for a complete curriculum offering; and engage partner universities to provide an academic grounding and a successful transition for students who wish to study or attain degrees in documentary linguistics.


NSF: HBCU-UP
Historically Black Colleges and Universities - Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP)

    Research Initiation Awards:

    • Letter of Intent: 7/24/17
    • Full Proposal: 10/03/17

    Targeted Infusion Projects, Broadening Participation Research Projects, Implementation Projects, ACE Implementation Projects:

    • Letter of Intent: 9/05/17
    • Full Proposal: 11/28/17

    Broadening Participation Research Centers:

    • Pre-Proposal: 3/21/17
    • Full Proposal: 11/22/17

Program Description: Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have awarded a large share of bachelor's degrees to African American students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), and nine of the top ten baccalaureate institutions of African American STEM doctorate recipients from 2008-2012 are HBCUs.[1] In 2012, 8.5% of black undergraduates attended HBCUs,[2] and HBCUs awarded 16.7% of the bachelor's degrees and 17.8% of the S&E bachelor's degrees to black students that year.[1] To meet the nation's accelerating demands for STEM talent, more rapid gains in achievement and successful degree completion in STEM for underrepresented minority populations are needed. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) is committed to enhancing the quality of undergraduate STEM education and research at HBCUs as a means to broaden participation in the nation's STEM workforce. To this end, HBCU-UP provides awards to develop, implement, and study evidence-based innovative models and approaches for improving the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may pursue STEM graduate programs and/or careers. Support is available for Targeted Infusion Projects, Broadening Participation Research Projects, Research Initiation Awards, Implementation Projects, Achieving Competitive Excellence Implementation Projects, and Broadening Participation Research Centers; as well as other funding opportunities. Targeted Infusion Projects (TIP) provide support to achieve a short-term, well-defined goal for improving the quality of undergraduate STEM education at HBCUs. The Broadening Participation Research (BPR) in STEM Education track provides support for research projects that seek to create and study new theory-driven models and innovations related to the participation and success of underrepresented groups in STEM undergraduate education. Research Initiation Awards (RIA) provide support for STEM faculty at HBCUs to pursue new research at the home institution, a NSF-funded research center, a research intensive institution or a national laboratory. Implementation Projects provide support to design, implement, study, and assess comprehensive institutional efforts for increasing the number of students receiving undergraduate degrees in STEM and enhancing the quality of their preparation by strengthening STEM education and research. Within this track, Achieving Competitive Excellence (ACE) Implementation Projects are intended for HBCUs with exemplary achievements and established institutionalized foundations from previous Implementation Project grants. Broadening Participation Research Centers provide support to conduct world-class research at institutions that have held three rounds of Implementation or ACE Implementation Projects and with demonstrated capability to conduct broadening participation research. Broadening Participation Research Centers are expected to represent the collective intelligence of HBCU STEM higher education, and serve as the national hubs for the rigorous study and broad dissemination of the critical pedagogies and culturally sensitive interventions that contribute to the success of HBCUs in educating African American STEM undergraduates. Centers are expected to conduct research on STEM education and broadening participation in STEM; perform outreach to HBCUs in order to build capacity for conducting this type of research; and work to transfer and disseminate promising broadening participation research in order to enhance STEM education and research outcomes for African American undergraduates across the country.


NSF: ADVANCE

ADVANCE: Increasing the Participation and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering Careers

    Partnerships LOI: 12/12/18

    Partnerships Full Proposal: 1/11/17

    ADVANCE Resource and Coordination Network Full Proposal: 3/15/17

    Institutional Transformation Preliminary Proposal: 4/12/17

    Adaptation Letter of Intent: 8/9/17

    Adaptation full proposal: 9/13/17

    Institutional Transformation Full Proposal: 1/17/18

Project Description: The goals of the ADVANCE program are

  1. to develop systemic approaches to increase the representation and advancement of women in academic STEM careers;
  2. to develop innovative and sustainable ways to promote gender equity in the STEM academic workforce; and
  3. to contribute to the development of a more diverse science and engineering workforce. ADVANCE also has as its goal to contribute to and inform the general knowledge base on gender equity in the academic STEM disciplines.

NSF: I-Corps Teams

Innovation Corps Teams Program

    Full Proposal Windows:

    • 1/01/17-03/15/17
    • 4/01/17-06/15/17
    • 7/1/17-9/15/17

Program Description: The National Science Foundation (NSF) seeks to develop and nurture a national innovation ecosystem that builds upon fundamental research to guide the output of scientific discoveries closer to the development of technologies, products and processes that benefit society.

In order to jumpstart a national innovation ecosystem, NSF has established the NSF Innovation Corps Teams Program (NSF I-Corps Teams). The NSF I-Corps Teams purpose is to identify NSF-funded researchers who will receive additional support - in the form of mentoring and funding - to accelerate innovation that can attract subsequent third-party funding.

The purpose of the NSF I-Corps Teams grant is to give the project team access to resources to help determine the readiness to transition technology developed by previously-funded or currently-funded NSF projects. The outcomes of I-Corps Teams projects will be threefold:

  1. a clear go or no go decision regarding viability of products and service,
  2. should the decision be to move the effort forward, a transition plan for those projects to move forward
  3. a technology demonstration for potential partners

NSF: ECR

EHR Core Research

    Full Proposal: 9/14/17

Project Description: The EHR Core Research (ECR) program establishes a mechanism in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources to provide funding in foundational research areas that are broad, essential and enduring. EHR seeks proposals that will help synthesize, build and/or expand research foundations in the following core areas: STEM learning, STEM learning environments, workforce development, and broadening participation in STEM. We invite researchers to identify and conduct research on questions or issues in order to advance the improvement of STEM learning in general, or to address specific challenges of great importance. Two types of proposals are invited: Core Research Proposals (maximum 5 years, $1.5 million) that propose to study a foundational research question/issue designed to inform the transformation of STEM learning and education and Capacity Building Proposals (maximum 3 years, $300,000) intended to support groundwork necessary for advancing research within the four core areas.


Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists

Project Description: Since 2007, the Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists have been open to scientists in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Beginning in the 2014 awards cycle, the Blavatnik Family Foundation and the New York Academy of Sciences expanded the faculty awards to include young scientists across the US. The Blavatnik National Awards recognize excellence in three disciplinary categories: Life Sciences; Physical Sciences & Engineering; and Chemistry. Every year, one Blavatnik Laureate in each category will receive $250,000 in unrestricted funds. The prize money is given directly to the Laureate.

Prospective nominees must be conducting research at one of the invited institutions as principal investigators and in charge of their own research program, hold a doctoral degree, and be born in 1975 or later. There are no residency or citizenship requirements to be nominated for the Blavatnik National Awards. Past faculty winners of the Blavatnik Regional Awards are not eligible.


NSF: DEL

Documenting Endangered Languages

Full Proposal Deadline: 9/15/17

Project Description: This funding partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) supports projects to develop and advance knowledge concerning endangered human languages. Made urgent by the imminent death of roughly half of the approximately 7000 currently used languages, this effort aims to exploit advances in information technology to build computational infrastructure for endangered language research. The program supports projects that contribute to data management and archiving, and to the development of the next generation of researchers. Funding can support fieldwork and other activities relevant to the digital recording, documenting, and archiving of endangered languages, including the preparation of lexicons, grammars, text samples, and databases. Funding will be available in the form of one- to three-year senior research grants as well as fellowships from six to twelve months and doctoral dissertation research improvement grants for up to 24 months.


NSF: SI2: SSE & SSI

Software Infrastructure for Sustained Innovation

    Campus Pre-Proposal, S2I2 Conceptualization (deadline past): 2/07/17

    Full Proposal, SSE: 3/07/17

    Full Proposal, S2I2 Conceptualization: 4/11/17

    Full Proposal, SSI: 9/19/17

Program Description:Software is an integral enabler of computation, experiment and theory and a primary modality for realizing the Cyberinfrastructure Framework for 21st Century Science and Engineering (CIF21) vision, as described in http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10015/nsf10015.jsp. Scientific discovery and innovation are advancing along fundamentally new pathways opened by development of increasingly sophisticated software. Software is also directly responsible for increased scientific productivity and significant enhancement of researchers' capabilities. In order to nurture, accelerate and sustain this critical mode of scientific progress, NSF has established the Software Infrastructure for Sustained Innovation (SI2) program, with the overarching goal of transforming innovations in research and education into sustained software resources that are an integral part of the cyberinfrastructure.

SI2 has been a long-term investment focused on catalyzing new thinking, paradigms, and practices in developing and using software to understand natural, human, and engineered systems. The intent of SI2 has been to foster a pervasive cyberinfrastructure to help researchers address problems of unprecedented scale, complexity, resolution, and accuracy by integrating computation, data, networking, observations and experiments in novel ways. NSF expects that its SI2 investment will result in trustworthy, robust, reliable, usable and sustainable software infrastructure that is critical to achieving the CIF21 vision and will transform science and engineering while contributing to the education of next-generation researchers and creators of future cyberinfrastructure. Indeed, education at all levels will play an important role in integrating such a dynamic cyberinfrastructure into the fabric of how science and engineering is performed.

As in previous rounds of this program, SI2 includes three classes of awards:

  1. Scientific Software Elements (SSE): SSE awards target small groups that will create and deploy robust software elements for which there is a demonstrated need that will advance one or more significant areas of science and engineering.
  2. Scientific Software Integration (SSI): SSI awards target larger, interdisciplinary teams organized around the development and application of common software infrastructure aimed at solving common research problems faced by NSF researchers in one or more areas of science and engineering. SSI awards will result in a sustainable community software framework serving a diverse community or communities.
  3. Scientific Software Innovation Institutes (S2I2): S2I2 awards are intended to establish long-term hubs of excellence in software infrastructure and technologies, which will serve a research community of substantial size and disciplinary breadth. S2I2 includes two subclasses of awards: Conceptualization Awards, which are planning awards aimed at organizing an interdisciplinary community and understanding their software requirements and challenges; and Implementation Awards, which will be made to implement community activities that support software infrastructure, for example, such as those developed by the conceptualization awards. Only Conceptualization proposals will be accepted for this solicitation cycle. However, successful Conceptualization proposals must reflect the quality, commitment, and planning that will be needed to lead to full Implementation awards. Conceptualization proposals submitted to NSF in response to this solicitation must exhibit clear relevance to the overall SI2 program and should be responsive to this solicitation and its review criteria. Proposals that are not relevant or not responsive to the solicitation will not be considered for funding and will be returned without review. Conceptualization proposals must also be in areas not covered by current Conceptualization and Implementation awards. For a list of awards, see Implementation of NSF Software Vision.

Simons Foundation

Simons Investigators Programs in Mathematics, Physics, Theoretical Computer Science, Mathematical Modeling of Living Systems, and Math+X Investigators

    Africa Mathematics Project Application Deadline: 8/31/16

    Simons Fellow Program Application Deadline: 9/29/16

    Simons Collagorations in Math & the Physical Sciences: 10/3/16

    Targeted Grants to Institutes: Application Deadline: 10/13/2016

    Targeted Grants in Mathematics and Physical Sciences LOI Deadline: Rolling

Project Description: Basis for Awards: The intent of the Investigator in Mathematics, Physics, and Theoretical Computer Science programs is to support outstanding scientists in their most productive years, when they are establishing creative new research directions, providing leadership to the field and effectively mentoring junior scientists.

The intent of the Investigator in MMLS program is to help launch the research careers of outstanding junior scientists. Nominees to the program will normally be in the first few years of their first faculty appointment. Nominations will be evaluated on the basis of nominees’ potential for scientific accomplishment.


Simons Foundation

Simons Investigators Programs in Mathematics, Physics, Theoretical Computer Science, Mathematical Modeling of Living Systems, and Math+X Investigators

Project Description: Basis for Awards: The intent of the Investigator in Mathematics, Physics, and Theoretical Computer Science programs is to support outstanding scientists in their most productive years, when they are establishing creative new research directions, providing leadership to the field and effectively mentoring junior scientists.

The intent of the Investigator in MMLS program is to help launch the research careers of outstanding junior scientists. Nominees to the program will normally be in the first few years of their first faculty appointment. Nominations will be evaluated on the basis of nominees’ potential for scientific accomplishment.

Eligibility: To be an Investigator in Mathematics, Physics, and Theoretical Computer Science, a scientist must be engaged in theoretical research in mathematics, physics or computer science and must have a primary appointment as a faculty member at a U.S., Canadian or U.K. institution with a Ph.D. program and not have previously been a Simons Investigator.

To be an Investigator in MMLS, a scientist must be engaged in research related to the program, must have a primary appointment as a faculty member at a United States or Canadian educational institution with a Ph.D. program and not previously have been a Simons Investigator. At the time of appointment, an Investigator should be in the early stages of an academic career (within five years of the start of his/her first faculty position) and, typically, be holding an assistant professorship or equivalent position.

A Simons Investigator in Mathematics, Physics, and Theoretical Computer Science is appointed for an initial period of five years. Renewal for an additional five years is contingent upon the evaluation of scientific impact of the Investigator. A Simons Investigator in MMLS is appointed for a period of five years.

An Investigator will receive research support of $100,000 per year. An additional $10,000 per year will be provided to the Investigator’s department. The award is administered through the institution at which the Investigator is appointed, and this institution will receive 20% in indirect costs.


Brain Research Foundation

Scientific Innovations Award

Project Description: Brain Research Foundation has invited eligible US academic institutions to nominate one senior faculty member to submit a Letter of Intent for the Scientific Innovations Award (SIA). Brain Research Foundation’s Scientific Innovations Award Program provides funding for innovative science in both basic and clinical neuroscience. This funding mechanism is designed to support creative, exploratory, cutting edge research in well-established research laboratories, under the direction of established investigators.
Brain Research Foundation’s Scientific Review Committee will review the SIA proposals and make recommendations for funding to the Foundation. The Committee consists of senior scientists broadly representing the various neuroscience-related programs. Two or more representatives of Brain Research Foundation are also present when the Committee meets.


William T. Grant Foundation
William T. Grant Scholars Grants

    Campus Pre-Proposal Deadline: 4/13/17

    Sponsor LOI Deadline: 6/29/17

    Application Deadline: 7/6/17

    Sponsor Proposal Deadline: 9/26/17

Project Description: The William T. Grant Scholars Program supports career development for promising earlycareer researchers. The program funds five-year research and mentoring plans that significantly expand junior researchers’ expertise in new disciplines, methods, and content areas. We recognize that early-career researchers are rarely given incentives or support to take such risks, so this award includes a mentoring component, as well as an emphasis on community and collaboration. Scholars Program applicants should have a track record of conducting high-quality research and an interest in pursuing a significant shift in their trajectories as researchers. Proposed research plans must address questions of policy and practice that are relevant to the Foundation’s focus areas.


RGK Foundation

Grants for Education, Community, and Medicine/Health

    Letter of Inquiry: no deadline

Program Description: RGK Foundation awards grants in the broad areas of Education, Community, and Health/Medicine.

The Foundation's primary interests within Education include programs that focus on formal K-12 education (particularly mathematics, science and reading), teacher development, literacy, and higher education.

Within Community, the Foundation supports a broad range of human services, community improvement, abuse prevention, and youth development programs. Human service programs of particular interest to the Foundation include children and family services, early childhood development, and parenting education. The Foundation supports a variety of Community Improvement programs including those that enhance non-profit management and promote philanthropy and voluntarism. Youth development programs supported by the Foundation typically include after-school educational enrichment programs that supplement and enhance formal education systems to increase the chances for successful outcomes in school and life. The Foundation is also interested in programs that attract female and minority students into the fields of mathematics, science, and technology.

The Foundation's current interests in the area of Health/Medicine include programs that promote the health and well-being of children, programs that promote access to health services, and Foundation-initiated programs focusing on ALS.