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Upcoming Funding Deadlines

November

DoD: MURI
Multidisciplinary Research Program of the University Research Initiative

    Inquiries and Questions for Proposal Deadline: 10/11/17

    Proposal Deadline: 11/1/17

    Inquiries and Questions for White Paper Proposal Deadline: 6/30/17

    White Paper Proposal Deadline: 7/17/17

Project Description: The MURI program supports basic research in science and engineering at U.S. institutions of higher education (hereafter referred to as "universities") that is of potential interest to DoD. The program is focused on multidisciplinary research efforts where more than one traditional discipline interacts to provide rapid advances in scientific areas of interest to the DoD. As defined in the DoD Financial Management Regulation:

Basic research is systematic study directed toward greater knowledge or understanding of the fundamental aspects of phenomena and of observable facts without specific applications towards processes or products in mind. It includes all scientific study and experimentation directed toward increasing fundamental knowledge and understanding in those fields of the physical, engineering, environmental, and life sciences related to long-term national security needs. It is farsighted high payoff research that provides the basis for technological progress (DoD 7000.14-R, vol. 2B, chap. 5, para. 050201.B).

DoD’s basic research program invests broadly in many specific fields to ensure that it has early cognizance of new scientific knowledge.


NSF: IUSE: EHR
Improving Undergraduate STEM Education

    Development and Implementation Tiers for Engaged Student Learning & Institution and Community Transformation: 1/11/17

Project Description: A well-prepared, innovative science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce is crucial to the Nation's health and economy. Indeed, recent policy actions and reports have drawn attention to the opportunities and challenges inherent in increasing the number of highly qualified STEM graduates, including STEM teachers. Priorities include educating students to be leaders and innovators in emerging and rapidly changing STEM fields as well as educating a scientifically literate populace. Both of these priorities depend on the nature and quality of the undergraduate education experience. In addressing these STEM challenges and priorities, the National Science Foundation invests in evidence-based and evidence-generating approaches to understanding STEM learning; to designing, testing, and studying instruction and curricular change; to wide dissemination and implementation of best practices; and to broadening participation of individuals and institutions in STEM fields. The goals of these investments include: increasing the number and diversity of STEM students, preparing students well to participate in science for tomorrow, and improving students' STEM learning outcomes.


NSF: SaTC

Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace

    Full Proposal Window MEDIUM Projects:10/12/17-10/19/17

    Full Propsal Window LARGE Projects: 10/12/17-10/19/17

    Full Proposal Window SMALL Projects: 11/2/17-11/16/17

    Full Propsal Window CYBERSECURITY Education Projects: 12/1/17-12/15/17

Project Description: Cyberspace has transformed the daily lives of people for the better. The rush to adopt cyberspace, however, has exposed its fragility and vulnerabilities: corporations, agencies, national infrastructure and individuals have been victims of cyber-attacks. In December 2011, the National Science and Technology Council with the cooperation of NSF has advanced a broad, coordinated federal strategic plan for cybersecurity research and development to "change the game," check the misuses of cyber technology, bolster education and training in cybersecurity, establish a science of cybersecurity, and transition promising cybersecurity research into practice. This challenge requires a dedicated approach to research, development, and education that leverages the disciplines of mathematics and statistics, the social sciences, and engineering with the computational and information sciences.


NSF: EAPSI
East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes for U.S. Graduate Students

Full Proposal Deadlines: 11/09/17, 11/08/18

Project Description: NSF and selected foreign counterpart science and technology agencies sponsor international research institutes for US graduate students in seven East Asia and Pacific locations at times set by the counterpart agencies between June and August each year. These Summer Institutes (EAPSI) operate similarly and the research visits to a particular location take place at the same time. Although applicants apply individually to participate in a Summer Institute, awardees become part of the cohort for each location. Applicants must propose a location, host scientist, and a research project that is appropriate for the host site and duration of the international visit. An EAPSI award provides U.S. graduate students in science, engineering, and education: 1) first-hand research experiences in Australia, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore or Taiwan; 2) an introduction to the science, science policy, and scientific infrastructure of the respective location; and 3) an orientation to the society, culture and language. It is expected that EAPSI awards will help students initiate professional relationships to enable future collaboration with foreign counterparts.


NSF: HBCU-UP
Historically Black Colleges and Universities - Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP)

    Research Initiation Awards:

    • Letter of Intent: 7/24/17
    • Full Proposal: 10/03/17

    Targeted Infusion Projects, Broadening Participation Research Projects, Implementation Projects, ACE Implementation Projects:

    • Letter of Intent: 9/05/17
    • Full Proposal: 11/28/17

    Broadening Participation Research Centers:

    • Pre-Proposal: 3/21/17
    • Full Proposal: 11/22/17

Program Description: Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have awarded a large share of bachelor's degrees to African American students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), and nine of the top ten baccalaureate institutions of African American STEM doctorate recipients from 2008-2012 are HBCUs.[1] In 2012, 8.5% of black undergraduates attended HBCUs,[2] and HBCUs awarded 16.7% of the bachelor's degrees and 17.8% of the S&E bachelor's degrees to black students that year.[1] To meet the nation's accelerating demands for STEM talent, more rapid gains in achievement and successful degree completion in STEM for underrepresented minority populations are needed. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) is committed to enhancing the quality of undergraduate STEM education and research at HBCUs as a means to broaden participation in the nation's STEM workforce. To this end, HBCU-UP provides awards to develop, implement, and study evidence-based innovative models and approaches for improving the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may pursue STEM graduate programs and/or careers. Support is available for Targeted Infusion Projects, Broadening Participation Research Projects, Research Initiation Awards, Implementation Projects, Achieving Competitive Excellence Implementation Projects, and Broadening Participation Research Centers; as well as other funding opportunities. Targeted Infusion Projects (TIP) provide support to achieve a short-term, well-defined goal for improving the quality of undergraduate STEM education at HBCUs. The Broadening Participation Research (BPR) in STEM Education track provides support for research projects that seek to create and study new theory-driven models and innovations related to the participation and success of underrepresented groups in STEM undergraduate education. Research Initiation Awards (RIA) provide support for STEM faculty at HBCUs to pursue new research at the home institution, a NSF-funded research center, a research intensive institution or a national laboratory. Implementation Projects provide support to design, implement, study, and assess comprehensive institutional efforts for increasing the number of students receiving undergraduate degrees in STEM and enhancing the quality of their preparation by strengthening STEM education and research. Within this track, Achieving Competitive Excellence (ACE) Implementation Projects are intended for HBCUs with exemplary achievements and established institutionalized foundations from previous Implementation Project grants. Broadening Participation Research Centers provide support to conduct world-class research at institutions that have held three rounds of Implementation or ACE Implementation Projects and with demonstrated capability to conduct broadening participation research. Broadening Participation Research Centers are expected to represent the collective intelligence of HBCU STEM higher education, and serve as the national hubs for the rigorous study and broad dissemination of the critical pedagogies and culturally sensitive interventions that contribute to the success of HBCUs in educating African American STEM undergraduates. Centers are expected to conduct research on STEM education and broadening participation in STEM; perform outreach to HBCUs in order to build capacity for conducting this type of research; and work to transfer and disseminate promising broadening participation research in order to enhance STEM education and research outcomes for African American undergraduates across the country.


Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists

Project Description: Since 2007, the Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists have been open to scientists in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Beginning in the 2014 awards cycle, the Blavatnik Family Foundation and the New York Academy of Sciences expanded the faculty awards to include young scientists across the US. The Blavatnik National Awards recognize excellence in three disciplinary categories: Life Sciences; Physical Sciences & Engineering; and Chemistry. Every year, one Blavatnik Laureate in each category will receive $250,000 in unrestricted funds. The prize money is given directly to the Laureate.

Prospective nominees must be conducting research at one of the invited institutions as principal investigators and in charge of their own research program, hold a doctoral degree, and be born in 1975 or later. There are no residency or citizenship requirements to be nominated for the Blavatnik National Awards. Past faculty winners of the Blavatnik Regional Awards are not eligible.