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Upcoming Funding Deadlines

*Grants that Accept Proposals at Anytime

April

NSF is encouraging submission of proposals related to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), as described in the March 4, 2020 Dear Colleague Letter (shown below):

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Research

In light of the emergence and spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the United States and abroad, the National Science Foundation (NSF) is accepting proposals to conduct non-medical, non-clinical-care research that can be used immediately to explore how to model and understand the spread of COVID-19, to inform and educate about the science of virus transmission and prevention, and to encourage the development of processes and actions to address this global challenge.

NSF encourages the research community to respond to this challenge through existing funding opportunities. In addition, we invite researchers to use the Rapid Response Research (RAPID) funding mechanism, which allows NSF to receive and review proposals having a severe urgency with regard to availability of or access to data, facilities or specialized equipment as well as quick-response research on natural or anthropogenic disasters and similar unanticipated events. Requests for RAPID proposals may be for up to $200K and up to one year in duration. Well-justified proposals that exceed these limits may be entertained. All questions should be directed either to a program officer managing an NSF program with which the research would be aligned or to rapid-covid19@nsf.gov.

Complete guidance on submitting a RAPID proposal may be found in Chapter II.E.1 of the NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide.

We ask that all investigators and organizations maintain awareness of the dynamic nature of this event through regular monitoring of official communications from the Centers for Disease Control and World Health Organization.

NSF has also provided Frequently Asked Questions that address questions associated with NSF proposal submission and award management relevant to research proposals relating to COVID-19 as well as possible impacts of COVID-19 on activities under existing awards and on participation in NSF's merit review panels; that website will be updated as appropriate.

Department of Undergraduate Education Coronavirus Research

NSF's Department of Undergraduate Education (DUE) is specifically interested in research on the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on undergraduate education.  The outbreak has altered undergraduate education in unforeseen ways, including forcing temporary closures and unplanned switches to online classes.  DUE thinks that research about the impacts of such responses on students and educators could provide important new knowledge about STEM learning, virtual learning environments, the impact of stress on learning, and many other important topics.

If you are engaged in such research or would like to do so, we encourage you to consider submitting a proposal to any of our relevant funding programs including:

(See https://www.nsf.gov/funding/programs.jsp?org=DUE)

Alternatively (or in addition), if you have an urgent research need or opportunity, you may consider submitting proposals via the following funding mechanisms:

  1. Submit a Rapid Response Research (RAPID) proposal. See Chapter II.E.1 of the NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide
  2. Request supplemental support for your existing award. See Chapter VI.E.4 of the NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide
  3. Organize a conference or workshop. See Chapter II.E.7 of the NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide

Possible topics of interest for these funding mechanisms include, but are not limited to, research on  the effectiveness of switching from an in-person to a completely online educational format and research on how the outbreak affects student attitudes, interests, and performance in STEM.

Important: Please contact a program officer to explore whether your needs might be appropriate for funding via the RAPID, Supplemental Support, or Conference mechanisms. A list of DUE staff is available at https://www.nsf.gov/staff/staff_list.jsp?org=DUE&from_org=DUE.


Cancer Research Institute

Postdoctoral Fellowships

    Application Deadline: April 1st and October 1st of every year; If a deadline falls on the weekend, applications are due the following Monday.

Project Description: The CRI Irvington Postdoctoral Fellowship Program is CRI's longest-standing continuous program. Postdoctoral fellowships provide support to fund and train young immunologists and cancer immunologists at top universities and research centers around the world. Fellows work and continue their training under the guidance of a world-renowned immunologist, who mentors the fellow and prepares him or her for a productive and successful career in cancer immunology. Fellows receive up to $175,500 over three years to cover the cost of salary, insurance, and other research-related expenses, such as travel to conferences and meetings.


NSF: ECCS

Electrical, Communications and Cyber Systems (ECCS)

Project Description: The NSF Division of Electrical, Communications and Cyber Systems (ECCS) supports enabling and transformative research at the nano, micro, and macro scales that fuels progress in engineering system applications with high societal impacts.

ECCS programs encompass novel electronic, photonic, and magnetic devices — and the integration of these devices into circuit and system environments, intelligent systems, control, and networks — for applications spanning communications and cyber technologies, energy and power, healthcare, environment, transportation, manufacturing, and other systems-related areas.

ECCS strongly emphasizes the integration of education into its research programs to ensure the preparation of a diverse and professionally skilled workforce. ECCS also strengthens its programs through links to other areas of engineering, science, industry, government, and international collaborations.

Division Programs

The Division has three program clusters, managed by teams of program directors, that reflect the increasing convergence of traditional disciplinary topics and the need for interdisciplinary approaches to emerging technological challenges.

 


NSF: STTR

Small Business Technology Transfer Program Phase I

Full Proposal Deadline:

    3/6/20-6/4/20

    6/5/20-9/3/20

    9/4/20-12/3/20

Small businesses can submit a Project Pitch at any time. Small businesses that have been invited to submit a full proposal can submit a proposal based on that Project Pitch at any time during one of the submission windows listed above.

Project Description: The STTR program is intended to support scientific excellence and technological innovation through the investment of federal research funds to build a strong national economy by stimulating technological innovation in the private sector; strengthening the role of small business in meeting federal research and development needs; increasing the commercial application of federally supported research results; and fostering and encouraging participation by socially and economically disadvantaged and women-owned small businesses.

The STTR program at NSF solicits proposals from the small business sector consistent with NSF's mission to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; and to secure the national defense.

Because the program has no topical or procurement focus, the NSF offers very broad solicitation topics that are intended to encourage as many eligible science- and technology-based small businesses as possible to compete for funding. The topics are detailed on the program website. In many cases, the program is also open to proposals focusing on technical and market areas not explicitly noted in the aforementioned topics.


NSF: TCUP

Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP)

    Preparing for TCUP Implementation: 9/9/20

    TCU Enterprise Advancement Centers (TEA Centers): 3/7/20 - 6/4/20

    Partnerships in Geoscience Education: 9/4/20

    Instructional Capacity Excellence in TCUP Institutions: 9/10/20 - 9/9/2021

    Targeted STEM Infusion Projects: 12/10/2020

    SEA-PHAGES in TCUs: 6/10/20; 6/10 Annually Thereafter

Project Description: A new funding track, Partnerships for Documentary Linguistics Education (PADLE), is offered collaboratively by this program and the Documenting Endangered Languages program (DEL) in the Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE). The strand provides support for collaborations that will improve TCUP institutions' instructional capacity in documentary linguistics (descriptive linguistics, computational methodology, archiving and preservation); attract, retain and support TCUP students in internships and research endeavors deemed to be necessary for a complete curriculum offering; and engage partner universities to provide an academic grounding and a successful transition for students who wish to study or attain degrees in documentary linguistics.


NSF: FM

Future Manufacturing

    LOI: 4/10/20

    Full Proposal deadline: 06/05/20

Project Description: As stated in the Strategy for American Leadership in Advanced Manufacturing, worldwide competition in manufacturing has been dominated in recent decades by the maturation, commoditization, and widespread application of computation in production equipment and logistics, effectively leveling the global technological playing field and putting a premium on low wages and incremental technical improvements.[1] The next generation of technological competition in manufacturing will be dictated by inventions of new materials, chemicals, devices, systems, processes, machines, design and work methods, social structures and business practices. Fundamental research will be required in robotics, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, materials science, sustainability, education and public policy, and workforce development to take the lead in this global competition. The research supported under this solicitation will enhance U.S. leadership in manufacturing far into the future by providing new capabilities for established companies and entrepreneurs, improving our health and quality of life, and reducing the impact of manufacturing industries on the environment.

The goal of this solicitation is to support fundamental research and education of a future workforce that will enable Future Manufacturing: manufacturing that either does not exist today or exists only at such small scales that it is not viable. Future Manufacturing will require the design and deployment of diverse new technologies for synthesis and sensing, and new algorithms for manufacturing new materials, chemicals, devices, components and systems. It will require new advances in artificial intelligence and machine learning, new cyber infrastructure, new approaches for mathematical and computational modeling, new dynamics and control methodologies, new ways to integrate systems biology, synthetic biology and bioprocessing, and new ways to influence the economy, workforce, human behavior, and society.

Among this array of technologies and potential research subjects, three thrust areas have been identified for support in FY 2020 under this solicitation: Future Cyber Manufacturing Research, Future Eco Manufacturing Research, and Future Biomanufacturing Research. This solicitation seeks proposals to perform fundamental research to enable new manufacturing capabilities in one or more of these thrust areas. It will support the following three award tracks:

    Future Manufacturing Research Grants (FMRG) - Two types of awards will be supported in FY 2020:

    1. Type I: $500,000 to $750,000 per year for up to five years.
    2. Type II: $750,000 to $2,000,000 per year for up to five years.

    Future Manufacturing Seed Grants (FMSG) - Awards in this track will provide support for up to two years at a level not to exceed $250,000 per year.

    Future Manufacturing Networks (FMNet) - Awards in this track will provide up to five years of support at a total amount of $500,000.

Interdisciplinary teams commensurate with the scope of the proposed research, education plan, and budget are required. Proposals must include demonstrated expertise among the team members to carry out the proposed research, education, and workforce development activities. The use of a convergence approach is expected[2].

The goal of this solicitation is to enable new manufacturing that represents a significant change from current practice. Therefore, proposers responding to this solicitation must include within the Project Description a section titled Enabling Future Manufacturing. Please see "Full Proposal Preparation Instructions" for additional details.

Realization of the benefits of the fundamental research supported under this solicitation will require the simultaneous education of a skilled technical workforce that can transition new discoveries into U.S. manufacturing companies. The National Science Board has recently emphasized this perspective in its report, "THE SKLLED TECHNICAL WORKFORCE: Crafting America's Science and Engineering Enterprise."[3] Therefore, proposers responding to this solicitation must include within the Project Description a section titled Education and Workforce Development Plan that describes plans to equip students and upskill the workforce to enable Future Manufacturing. Please see "Full Proposal Preparation Instructions" for additional details.


NSF: PFI

Partnerships for Innovation

    Campus Pre-Proposal (only for PFI-RP track): 4/16/20, via this form.

    Full Proposal deadline: 7/8/20/ 7/14/21 (second Wednesday in July annually thereafter)

    Full Proposal deadline: 01/13/21; 1/12/22 (second Wednesday in January annually thereafter)

Project Description: The Partnerships for Innovation (PFI) Program within the Division of Industrial Innovation and Partnerships (IIP) offers researchers from all disciplines of science and engineering funded by NSF the opportunity to perform translational research and technology development, catalyze partnerships and accelerate the transition of discoveries from the laboratory to the marketplace for societal benefit.

PFI has five broad goals, as set forth by the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act of 2017 (“the Act”, S.3084 — 114th CongressSec. 602. Translational Research Grants): (1) identifying and supporting NSF-sponsored research and technologies that have the potential for accelerated commercialization; (2) supporting prior or current NSF-sponsored investigators, institutions of higher education, and non-profit organizations that partner with an institution of higher education in undertaking proof-of-concept work, including the development of technology prototypes that are derived from NSF-sponsored research and have potential market value; (3) promoting sustainable partnerships between NSF-funded institutions, industry, and other organizations within academia and the private sector with the purpose of accelerating the transfer of technology; (4) developing multi-disciplinary innovation ecosystems which involve and are responsive to the specific needs of academia and industry; (5) providing professional development, mentoring, and advice in entrepreneurship, project management, and technology and business development to innovators.

In addition, PFI responds to the mandate set by Congress in Section 601(c)(3) of the Act (Follow-on Grants), to support prototype or proof-of-concept development work by participants, including I-Corps participants, with innovations that because of the early stage of development are not eligible to participate in a Small Business Innovation Research Program or a Small Business Technology Transfer Program.

Finally, PFI seeks to implement the mandate set by Congress in Section 102(c)(a) of the Act (Broader Impacts Review Criterion Update) by enhancing partnerships between academia and industry in the United States, and expanding the participation of women and individuals from underrepresented groups in innovation, technology translation, and entrepreneurship.

This solicitation offers two broad tracks for proposals in pursuit of the aforementioned goals: (The limit on the number of proposals submitted by an eligible organization has been eliminated for the PFI-TT track. However, an organization may submit no more than one (1) proposal to the PFI-RP track per submission deadline.)

The Technology Translation (PFI-TT) track offers the opportunity to translate prior NSF-funded research results in any field of science or engineering into technological innovations with promising commercial potential and societal impact. PFI-TT supports commercial potential demonstration projects for academic research outputs in any NSF-funded science and engineering discipline. This demonstration is achieved through proof-of-concept, prototyping, technology development and/or scale-up work. Concurrently, students and postdoctoral researchers who participate in PFI-TT projects receive education and leadership training in innovation and entrepreneurship. Successful PFI-TT projects generate technology-driven commercialization outcomes that address societal needs.

The Research Partnerships (PFI-RP) track seeks to achieve the same goals as the PFI-TT track by supporting instead complex, multi-faceted technology development projects that are typically beyond the scope of a single researcher or institution and require a multi-organizational, interdisciplinary, synergistic collaboration. A PFI-RP project requires the creation of partnerships between academic researchers and third-party organizations such as industry, non-academic research organizations, federal laboratories, public or non-profit technology transfer organizations or other universities. Such partnerships are needed to conduct applied research on a stand-alone larger project toward commercialization and societal impact. In the absence of such synergistic partnership, the project’s likelihood for success would be minimal.

The intended outcomes of both PFI-TT and PFI-RP tracks are: a) the commercialization of new intellectual property derived from NSF-funded research outputs; b) the creation of new or broader collaborations with industry (including increased corporate sponsored research); c) the licensing of NSF-funded research outputs to third party corporations or to start-up companies funded by a PFI team; and d) the training of future innovation and entrepreneurship leaders.

WEBINARS: Webinars will be held to answer questions about the solicitation. Registration will be available on the NSF Partnerships for Innovation website (https://www.nsf.gov/PFI). Potential proposers and their partners are encouraged to attend.


NSF: EPSCoR RII Track-4

EPSCoR Research Infrastructure Improvement Track 4: EPSCoR Research Fellows (RII Track-4)

    Full Proposal: 5/12/20; 4/13/21 (Second Tuesday in April, Annually Thereafter)

Program Description: The Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) is designed to fulfill the mandate of the National Science Foundation (NSF) to promote scientific progress nationwide. EPSCoR jurisdictions that are eligible for RII competitions are listed in the RII Eligibility table, which can be found here. Through this program, NSF establishes partnerships with government, higher education, and industry that are designed to effect sustainable improvements in a jurisdiction's research infrastructure, Research and Development (R&D) capacity, and hence, its R&D competitiveness. One of the strategic goals of the EPSCoR program is to establish sustainable Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) professional development pathways that advance STEM workforce development.

RII Track-4 provides awards to build research capacity in institutions and transform the career trajectories of non-tenured investigators and to further develop their individual research potential through extended collaborative visits to the nation's premier private, governmental, or academic research centers. Through collaborative research visits at the host site, fellowship awardees will be able to learn new techniques, develop new collaborations or advance existing partnerships, benefit from access to unique equipment and facilities, and/or shift their research toward potentially transformative new directions The experiences gained through the fellowships are intended to have lasting impacts that will enhance the Fellows' research trajectories well beyond the award period. These benefits to the Fellows are also expected to in turn improve the research capacity of their institutions and jurisdictions more broadly. Those submitting proposals must either hold a non-tenured faculty appointment at an institution of higher education or an early-career career-track appointment at an eligible non-degree-granting institution.


NSF: IUCRC

Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers Program (IUCRC)

    Sponsor pre-proposal deadlines:

    • 10/16/20, Third Wednesday in October annually thereafter
    • 04/21/21, Third Wednesday in April annually thereafter

    Sponsor full proposal deadline:

    • 6/17/20, Third Wednesday in June annually thereafter
    • 12/18/20, Third Wednesday in December annually thereafter

Project Description: The Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers (IUCRC) program develops long-term partnerships among industry, academe, and government. The Centers are catalyzed by an investment from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and are primarily supported by industry Center members, with NSF taking a supporting role in the development and evolution of the Center. Each Center is established to conduct research that is of interest to both the industry members and the Center faculty. An IUCRC contributes to the nation's research infrastructure base and enhances the intellectual capacity of the engineering and science workforce through the integration of research and education. As appropriate, an IUCRC uses international collaborations to advance these goals within the global context.


David & Lucile Packard Foundation

Packard Fellowships for Science and Engineering

    Campus Pre-Proposal Deadline: 2/7/20 (past), via this form

    Sponsor Nomination Deadline: 3/16/20

    All application materials must be submitted to the foundation 4/20/20

Project Description: Candidates must be faculty members who are eligible to serve as principal investigators engaged in research in the natural and physical sciences or engineering and must be within the first three years of their faculty careers. Disciplines that will be considered include physics, chemistry, mathematics, biology, astronomy, computer science, earth science, ocean science, and all branches of engineering. Candidates engaged in research in the social sciences will not be considered. The Fellowship Program provides support for highly creative researchers early in their careers; faculty members who are well established and well-funded are less likely to receive the award. Packard Fellows are inquisitive, passionate scientists and engineers who take a creative approach to their research, dare to think big, and follow new ideas wherever they lead. The Foundation emphasizes support for innovative individual research that involves the Fellows, their students, and junior colleagues, rather than extensions or components of large-scale, ongoing research programs.


NSF: ADVANCE

ADVANCE: Organizational Change for Gender Equity in STEM Academic Professions

Adaptation

  • LOI: 8/03/20 (First Monday in August, Annually Thereafter)
  • Full Prop: 11/4/20 (First Wednesday in November, Annually Thereafter. Must submit an LOI.)

Catalyst

  • Full Proposal: 08/07/20 (First Friday in August, Annually Thereafter)

Partnership

  • LOI: 8/03/20 (First Monday in August, Annually Thereafter)
  • Full Prop: 11/4/20 (First Wednesday in November, Annually Thereafter. Must submit an LOI.)

Institutional Transformation

  • Pre-Proposal: 4/22/21 (Fourth Thursday in April, Annually Thereafter. Preliminary proposals are only required for institutions of higher education that want to submit a full IT proposal. IT pre-proposals are accepted before and after the target date.)
  • Full Proposal: 10/07/21 (First Thursday in October, Annually Thereafter)

The NSF ADVANCE program contributes to the National Science Foundation's goal of a more diverse and capable science and engineering workforce.1 In this solicitation, NSF ADVANCE seeks to build on prior NSF ADVANCE work and other research and literature concerning gender, racial, and ethnic equity. The NSF ADVANCE program goal is to broaden the implementation of evidence-based systemic change strategies that promote equity for STEM2 faculty in academic workplaces and the academic profession. The NSF ADVANCE program provides grants to enhance the systemic factors that support equity and inclusion and to mitigate the systemic factors that create inequities in the academic profession and workplaces. Systemic (or organizational) inequities may exist in areas such as policy and practice as well as in organizational culture and climate. For example, practices in academic departments that result in the inequitable allocation of service or teaching assignments may impede research productivity, delay advancement, and create a culture of differential treatment and rewards. Similarly, policies and procedures that do not mitigate implicit bias in hiring, tenure, and promotion decisions could lead to women and racial and ethnic minorities being evaluated less favorably, perpetuating historical under-participation in STEM academic careers and contributing to an academic climate that is not inclusive.

All NSF ADVANCE proposals are expected to use intersectional approaches in the design of systemic change strategies in recognition that gender, race and ethnicity do not exist in isolation from each other and from other categories of social identity. The solicitation includes four funding tracks: Institutional Transformation (IT)AdaptationPartnership, and Catalyst, in support of the NSF ADVANCE program goal to broaden the implementation of systemic strategies that promote equity for STEM faculty in academic workplaces and the academic profession.

  • The Institutional Transformation (IT) track is designed to support the development, implementation, and evaluation of innovative systemic change strategies that promote gender equity for STEM faculty within an institution of higher education.
  • The Adaptation track is designed to support the work to adapt, implement, and evaluate evidence-based systemic change strategies that have been shown to promote gender equity for STEM faculty in academic workplaces and the academic profession. Adaptation projects can either: 1) support the adaptation of evidence-based systemic change strategies to promote equity for STEM faculty within an institution of higher education; or 2) facilitate national or regional STEM disciplinary transformation by adapting evidence-based systemic change strategies to non-profit, non-academic organizations.
  • The Partnership track is designed to support the work to facilitate the broader adaptation of gender equity and systemic change strategies. Partnership projects are expected to result in national or regional transformation in STEM academic workplaces and the academic profession and demonstrate significant reach. Partnership projects can focus on the transformation of institutions and organizations and/or the transformation within one or more STEM disciplines.
  • The Catalyst track is designed to broaden the types of IHEs that are able to undertake data collection and institutional self-assessment work to identify systemic gender inequities impacting their STEM faculty so that these can be addressed by the institution.

Please note that NSF ADVANCE does not provide fellowships, research, or travel grants to individual students, postdoctoral researchers, or faculty to pursue STEM degrees or research. Undergraduate STEM opportunities can be found at stemundergrads.science.gov and graduate STEM opportunities at stemgradstudents.science.gov.


NIH: RM1

PAR-20-103: Collaborative Program Grant for Multidisciplinary Teams (RM1-Clinical Trial Optional)

    Campus Pre-Prop: 03/13/20 at noon, via this form

    LOI: 4/27/20; 12/27/20

    Full Prop: 05/27/20; 01/27/21

All applications are due by 5:00 PM local time of applicant organization. All types of non-AIDS applications allowed for this funding opportunity announcement are due on the listed date(s).

Applicants are encouraged to apply early to allow adequate time to make any corrections to errors found in the application during the submission process by the due date.

Project Description: This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is designed to support highly integrated research teams of three to six PDs/PIs to address ambitious and challenging research questions that are important for the mission of NIGMS and are beyond the scope of one or two investigators. Collaborative program teams are expected to accomplish goals that require considerable synergy and managed team interactions. Project goals should not be achievable with a collection of individual efforts or projects. Teams are encouraged to consider far-reaching objectives that will produce major advances in their fields.

Applications that are mainly focused on the creation, expansion, and/or maintenance of community resources, creation of new technologies, or infrastructure development are not appropriate for this FOA.


SRC GRC

Semiconductor Research Corporation: Governance, Risk and Compliance (GRC)

    Call for White Papers in Hardware Security (HWS): Due April 30, 2020 by 3:00 PM EDT / 12:00P PM PDT

    Artificial Intelligence Hardware (AIHW): May 27, 2020

    Analog/Mixed-Signal Circuits, Systems, and Devices (AMS-CSD): June 1, 2020

    Logic and Memory Devices (LMD): June 1, 2020

    Nanomanufacturing Materials and Processes (NMP): June 1, 2020

Project Description: As a mission-driven research consortium, GRC funds research to address a member-defined research agenda. GRC addresses the broader agenda of the industry through core research, and the specific research agenda of individual members through custom research. While selections of core research projects are made by member community representatives familiar with the technical area in focus, selection of custom research projects are made by individual, eligible member companies. Custom research currently comprises about one-fifth of the overall research budget.

GRC may issue a call for white papers; promising projects result in requests for proposal. The typical result of a successful research proposal is a multi-year research contract with an initial 12-month funding term. At the end of the research contract period, researchers may re-compete for new support. Alternatively, GRC may issue a call for grant applications; in this case, successful submissions are funded as grants.


*Grants that Accept Proposals at Anytime